An EV without the Q: the Hyundai Kona

Sponsored Content

14.9.2020

You’ve made the decision to go electric. You’ve done the sums, read the Electrifying.com reviews and watched our videos. You are fully prepared to enter this brave new world – all you need now is a car.

But actually getting hold of a battery-powered car might not be as easy as you’d expect. You’re not the only one who has realised the numerous benefits of driving an EV, and as a result sales are booming. In fact, it has caught some car makers by surprise, meaning they didn’t order enough cars from the factory or are finding it tricky to get hold of vital parts to build them – such as batteries. It means there are waiting lists for some cars and others have actually put orders on hold.

Luckily there are some cars which are available, and one of them is a favourite of ours here at Electrifying HQ – the Hyundai Kona Electric. If you are anxious to get a new 70 registration plate electric car on your drive, then a Hyundai retailer will be able to find you a Kona in days rather than weeks or months.

This is a big turnaround from the situation a year ago, when the waiting list for a Kona stretched to almost a year at some points. Hyundai reacted to this demand and, predicting the boom in electric sales, -, secured a greater allocation of Konas for the UK market.  

These cars have now arrived, meaning there is availability for buyers who want a great EV without the wait. 

Hyundai retailers will be able to find you a Kona in days rather than weeks or months

The Kona is a family-sized small SUV which is packed with technology. There are now two choices of powertrain too: option one comes equipped with a 39kWh battery giving a 186-mile range. Its motor produces 136bhp, which is about the same as a 1.6-litre petrol or diesel engine and gives plenty of performance for everyday motoring. 

Then there’s also the ‘long-range’ version, available in Premium and Premium SE specification. This has a whopping 64kWh giving a 278 mile range. That’s enough to drive from Brighton to Leeds without stopping, or cover 18 days of average 15 mile commutes without needing to plug in.  

This is the model which caused a proper stir when it was launched as it can travel further than electric cars costing twice as much. The motor is also upgraded along with the battery with a hefty 204bhp. That power output raised a few eyebrows too, as it’s the sort of figure you’d get from a turbocharged 2-litre petrol engine. 

What about the costs? Well Kona Electric prices start at just over £30,000, and a mid-range Premium with the bigger battery and more powerful engine costs just over £36,000 after the government grant has been deducted. This may sound higher than a petrol or diesel, but it’s worth spending some time with a calculator to see what the total cost of ownership will be over the time you own the car. 

An electric Kona can drive from Brighton to Leeds without stopping

This is the model which caused a proper stir when it was launched as it can travel further than electric cars costing twice as much. The motor is also upgraded along with the battery with a hefty 204bhp. That power output raised a few eyebrows too, as it’s the sort of figure you’d get from a turbocharged 2-litre petrol engine. 

What about the costs? Well Kona Electric prices start at just over £30,000, and a mid-range Premium with the bigger battery and more powerful engine costs just over £36,000 after the government grant has been deducted. This may sound higher than a petrol or diesel, but it’s worth spending some time with a calculator to see what the total cost of ownership will be over the time you own the car. 

Firstly, it’s unlikely that you’ll just pay a lump sum for the car as most vehicles are bought with some form of finance. Hyundai’s current offer for this particular model is £296 per month with a £3,543 deposit on a Personal Contract Hire. That’s similar – or even less – than an equivalent petrol or diesel.

This is possible because depreciation is the biggest cost of running almost any new car. As most car finance is based around the residual value of the car (you just pay for the depreciation and interest if you get a car through a PCP, PCH or lease) this means the monthly payments to get into an electric car are lower.

What about other costs? Fuel will be the biggest saving of course – if you charge at home the amount you spend on electricity will be roughly a quarter of your fuel bill. You’ll also wake up to a full ‘tank’ every morning, meaning you’ll never have to go to a fuel station again (unless you fancy a pasty or some barbeque charcoal). 

If you have the option to charge at work, the fuel costs will plummet further and there is no tax liability for plugging in at the office. Just make sure you get permission from the boss first!

Charging is far cheaper than fuelling

When it comes to servicing and maintenance, electric cars are generally far cheaper to run as they have far less to  replace or go wrong than the equivalent petrol or diesel. There’s no oil to change, emissions to check, fuel to filter or clutch to fix. As the brakes are used less thanks to regenerative braking (where the energy used to slow down is sent back to the battery), those parts last longer too. 

In the case of the Kona, Hyundai is running a national EV event from the 11th -20th  September where you’ll get the first three services free, meaning it will cost even less to run. As with all Hyundai models, the Kona is backed by a five year, 100,000 mile warranty too and an 8 year battery warranty. 

Then there is free road tax, savings from any congestion charge and emission zone charges and free parking or other incentives in some towns. The government is looking at other incentives too which would make living with anelectric car even easier.

If you can lease the car using salary sacrifice or have one as a company car, the savings will move from being marginal into the ‘no-brainer’ category – an electric car has 0% benefit in kind for company drivers and could save thousands compared to a conventional-engined car. Choose the Kona and you could start saving right now.

Salary Sacrifice and company car schemes can get you inside a Kona for less than you expect

Share this post

Related Posts