Here to clear the air

Range Rover Sport P400e

All the luxury and ability of the standard Range Rover Sport but with more efficient petrol-hybrid power to help out company car drivers.

  • Battery size: 13kWh
  • Miles per £: 11.6 (electric)
  • Battery warranty: 8 years / 100,000 miles
  • Emissions: 69g/km
  • Range: 25 miles (electric)

Nicki Says

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7/10

“Unlike Mr.Tom, I quite like the idea of sitting up high and having plenty of space for the whole family, so a mildly electrified Range Rover Sport makes sense. Plus, it manages 64g/km of CO2 officially, and if you plug it in regularly, makes more financial sense than a big diesel or petrol. If only it had a real-world 50-mile EV-only range it would make all the difference. ”

Tom Says

6/10

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“I’m not a huge fan of PHEVs with very limited EV-only range, and the P400e will only see it’s purported 31-mile best in a lab. Best use would be regular plugging-in and town work, but then you’ve got to ask if you really need a 2.5-tonne SUV. Mind you, the 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine and EV boost means 398bhp - which isn’t to be sniffed at… ”



The Range Rover Sport has been a runaway success for Land Rover for years. It takes all we know and love about the super-posh Range Rover, distills it into a slightly smaller, more manageable (and, in some cases more practical) package, and adds some fun to the mix.

Both cars have a reputation for being not the most environmentally friendly thanks to their bulky dimensions and the large engines under their bonnets, but the P400e series changes that. 

The Range Rover Sport P400e uses a small petrol engine along with an electric motor that you plug in to charge it up. It gives around 25 miles of silent electric running that’s perfectly in keeping with the Range Rover’s luxurious image, and can give great tax breaks for those using one as a company car. 


That 25-odd-mile electric range sounds good but it will take quite a bit of effort to get the most out of it. At the heart of the Range Rover Sport P400e is a 296bhp 2.0-litre four-cylinder petrol engine which is mated to a 114bhp electric motor and a 13kWh battery pack. It all works very smoothly and there are a number of EV driving modes to ‘save’ electricity or charge on the move. But, like all plug-in hybrids, you really need to plug it in as often as you can in order to make the sums add up. 

Just like the similarly powered Volvo XC90 T8, if the batteries are empty the P400e’s 2.0-litre feels a little strained when pulling around such a large SUV. Both the Porsche Cayenne e-Hybrid and the BMW X5 xDrive 45e come with 3.0-litre six-cylinder engines which are smoother and punchier. In fact the BMW trumps all of its rivals by offering a very impressive 54 miles of pure EV running and consequently is cheaper to run for company car drivers. 

By opting for the P400e over a standard Range Rover Sport it means you lose some practicality. Most Sports come with the option of having seven seats but, due to the battery being positioned under the boot floor, the P400e only comes with five (and has a higher boot floor, too). While that sounds like a black mark against the Range Rover Sport, it’s a feature that affects the BMW X5 45e too and the British SUV is still more than large enough inside, though.

While not class-leading when it comes to fun behind the wheel, the Sport P400e feels way more agile than the bigger Range Rover P400e and the Volvo XC90 T8, and has the measure of the BMW X5 45e. But the Sport has a trump card over its rivals: It’s a Land Rover product which means it boasts seriously impressive off-roading tech which makes it stand out against its rivals.    

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