Hyundai IONIQ 5 Review

Price: £43,150 to £54,150

Electrifying.com score

9/10

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It barely seems believable that the Hyundai IONIQ 5 arrived on the scene as long ago as 2021. In that time, the Korean five-seater has established itself as one of the best all-round long-range electric cars in the business. Is it still a great option for drivers looking to make the switch to electric? 

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  • Battery sizes: 58kWh and 77.4kWh
  • Miles per kWh: 4.1
  • E-Rating™: A+

    Click here to find out more about our electric car Efficiency Rating.​

  • Max charge rate: 225 kW
  • WLTP range: 238 miles (58kWh) 315 miles (77.4kWh)
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  • Battery sizes: 58kWh and 77.4kWh
  • Miles per kWh: 4.1
  • E-Rating™: A+

    Click here to find out more about our electric car Efficiency Rating.​

  • Max charge rate: 225 kW
  • WLTP range: 238 miles (58kWh) 315 miles (77.4kWh)
  • Electrifying.com E-Rating A+

Ginny Says

“Hyundai came early to the electric car party and feels a step ahead in many respects. I love the look of the IONIQ 5 and although it's not quite as efficient as its predecessors, it's well made and great for longer hauls”

Tom Says

“If you like to stand out from the crowd but still value things like practicality and comfort then I reckon the IONIQ 5 is worth a look. The quality seems first rate and although it's not the most dynamic thing to drive, it's a good package.”

Reviewed by 

Mike Askew

 - 
19 Jun 2024

It looks expensive for a Hyundai, but the technology and quality of experience backs it up. The Koreans are premium players now.

  • Price:£43,150 to £57,650
  • Full charge cost (approx. – based on home charging):£9.50
  • Company car tax :2% (2022-23)
  • Insurance group:29-40
  • Warranty:5 years/unlimited miles
  • Battery:8 years/100,000 miles

Pricing

You currently have three different spec levels, two batteries and three power outputs to choose from, though in reality your choice is a little simpler, especially if you’re looking for a bargain at the bottom of the range. Prices start at a touch over £37,000 for the entry SE Connect model, which only comes with the smaller 58kWh battery, which in turn only comes mated to the 168bhp motor. If you’re in love with the looks and don’t need more than 200 miles of range in the real world, it’s all you need – especially as equipment levels are so generous.

Craving more? Upgrading to the bigger battery costs £2,650 with like-for-like equipment, or £5,850 if you want the full 300bhp powerplant. If you want your IONIQ 5 to be a tech and comfort showcase, then you need Ultimate spec, which brings 20in alloys to the two more potent powertrains, while boosting the interior with 64-colour ambient lighting and the option of those lie-flat front seats. It’s £42,040 with the smaller battery, rising to a nudge under £50,000 with the full-fat battery and motor. Lots for a Hyundai, but it’s a Hyundai with lots built into it.

Running Costs

Smaller battery sizes than its Kia EV6 cousin lead to smaller charging costs. A complete charge on a home wall box is less than a tenner, while you’re looking at roughly £8 for an 80 per cent charge on a fast street charger. Given a similarly sized petrol-powered crossover is going to cost at least £40 over a 250-mile journey, those are strong numbers indeed.

Insurance groups look on par for the class – similar to an Audi Q4 e-tron’s, for instance – showing the level Hyundai now operates at. But the company hasn’t abandoned its value roots entirely, and the IONIQ 5’s warranty matches the rest of the Korean company’s products, at a massive five years with unlimited mileage.

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