Nissan Leaf Review

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Price: £28,495- £34,945

Electrifying.com score

7/10

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The world’s best-selling electric car is a practical, fun-to-drive, no compromise family hatchback that just happens to be powered by electricity. But rivals are overtaking it now.

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  • Battery size: 40 – 62kWh
  • Miles per kWh: 3.85
  • E-Rating™: A+ to B

    Click here to find out more about our electric car Efficiency Rating.​

  • Max charge rate: 50 kW
  • Range: 168-239 miles
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  • Battery size: 40 – 62kWh
  • Miles per kWh: 3.85
  • E-Rating™: A+ to B

    Click here to find out more about our electric car Efficiency Rating.​

  • Max charge rate: 50 kW
  • Range: 168-239 miles
  • Nissan Leaf e plus
  • Nissan Leaf e plus
  • Nissan Leaf e plus
  • Nissan Leaf e plus
  • Nissan Leaf e plus
  • Electrifying.com E-Rating A+
Driven and reviewed by Electrifying.com・ Published: 27/02/2020・Updated: 17/10/2022

Tom Says

“The Leaf is a good bet if you find the thought of an electric car a bit daunting. It’s just a hatchback. A hatchback that looks like it’s been hit several times with a flat shovel, granted, but it’s still very user-friendly. I think you should go for mid-range Acenta to get the best value for money.”

Ginny Says

“Nissan was first to launch a mainstream electric car and all their knowledge has gone into this latest model. It’s an easy car to live with and makes owning an EV feel like a mainstream choice. But there are now newer rivals which make it seem as though autumn has arrived for the Leaf.”

Nissan Leaf e plus

All Nissan Leafs are easy to drive, corner well and feel lively. It’s not a sports car but is surprising fun.

  • 0-60mph:11.5 secs to 7.3 secs
  • Top speed:89 to 97mph

Performance

The Leaf isn’t supposed to be a performance car, but it still feels quite lively, especially from a standstill to around 30mph. Unlike petrol or diesel engines, the electric motor in an electric car produces power instantly and it gives the Leaf a very perky feel. The power does tail off as the car gets faster, but it never feels slow compared to a conventional car. 

Using all the Leaf’s performance will hurt the battery range though, so it’s best to only try and play when you are not worried about running low on charge.

If range or performance are a concern, then the top e+ model might be the best choice. This adds more battery capacity but also has a more powerful motor - with 216bhp, it is comparable to some sports cars. This makes this Leaf much faster accelerating, especially between 30-70 mph when you are joining a motorway from a slip road, for example.

Drive

Anyone who is used to driving an automatic car should be able to get in a Leaf and drive it straight away without having to delve into the instruction manual. Some of the extra features might take a little more time, but could still be mastered by the end of a test drive.

Out on the road, the Leaf soaks up bumps well and the steering is not over-light. Most of the Nissan’s rivals are SUV-shaped, with means they feel quite top-heavy in corners. The Leaf feels more stable as a result of being lower. 

To make the Leaf as eco-friendly as possible, it features special tyres which roll more easily on the road, preserving energy. However they are not as grippy in the corners and can lose grip gradually if you take a roundabout too quickly.

The e+ model is a little heavier and faster too, so Nissan made the suspension springs stiffer to compensate. As a result the body doesn’t move and roll as much in corners but it does also mean it can’t absorb bumps as smoothly.

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